Home arrow บทความทั่วไป arrow วิถีแห่งเต๋า บทที่- 39: ขอเป็นระฆังหิน
Home    Contacts



วิถีแห่งเต๋า บทที่- 39: ขอเป็นระฆังหิน PDF พิมพ์

                    ในอดีตกาลสิ่งเหล่านี้ได้รวมกันเป็นหนึ่งเดียว

                    จากความเป็นหนึ่งเดียวฟ้าก็กระจ่างแจ้ง

                    จากความเป็นหนึ่งเดียวพื้นดินก็มั่นคง

                    จากความเป็นหนึ่งเดียวดวงจิตก็ศักดิ์สิทธิ์

                    จากความเป็นหนึ่งเดียวแหล่งน้ำก็เปี่ยมล้น

                    จากความเป็นหนึ่งเดียวสรรพสิ่งก็ดำเนินไปและเติบโต

                    จากความเป็นหนึ่งเดียวกษัตริย์จึงได้ปกครองไพร่ฟ้า

                    นี่คือสาเหตุของความเป็นไป

 

                    หากฟ้าไม่กระจ่างแจ้งก็จะพังทลาย

                    หากพื้นดินไม่มั่นคงก็จะแตกร้าว

                    หากดวงจิตไร้ความศักดิ์สิทธิ์ก็จะดับสูญ

                    หากแหล่งน้ำไม่เปี่ยมล้นก็จะเหือดแห้ง

                    หากสรรพสัตว์ไร้พลังแห่งชีวิตก็จะแตกดับ

                    หากกษัตริย์ไร้อำนาจก็จะถูกโค่นล้ม

 

                    ดังนั้นการเป็นผู้สูงส่งต้องพึ่งพาคนสามัญช่วยสนับสนุน

                    ความรุ่งโรจน์ต้องอาศัยความต่ำต้อยเป็นพื้นฐาน

39 The things which from of old have got the One (the Tao) are--

Heaven which by it is bright and pure; Earth rendered thereby firm and sure; Spirits with powers by it supplied; Valleys kept full throughout their void All creatures which through it do live Princes and kings who from it get The model which to all they give.

All these are the results of the One (Tao).

If heaven were not thus pure, it soon would rend; If earth were not thus sure, it would break and bend; Without these powers, the spirits soon would fail; If not so filled, the drought would parch each vale; Without that life, creatures would pass away; Princes and kings, without that moral sway, However grand and high, would all decay.

Thus it is that dignity finds its (firm) root in its (previous) meanness, and what is lofty finds its stability in the lowness (from which it rises). Hence princes and kings call themselves 'Orphans,' 'Men of small virtue,' and as 'Carriages without a nave.' Is not this an acknowledgment that in their considering themselves mean they see the foundation of their dignity? So it is that in the enumeration of the different parts of a carriage we do not come on what makes it answer the ends of a carriage. They do not wish to show themselves elegant-looking as jade, but (prefer) to be coarse-looking as an (ordinary) stone.

 
< ก่อนหน้า   ถัดไป >
สถิติผู้เยี่ยมชม: 44660118
ขณะนี้มี 3 บุคคลทั่วไป ออนไลน์

สมัครสมาชิก
เพื่อรับเอกสารเพิ่ม!